Russian roulette

PHOTO PROMPT © Dale Rogerson

 

Klaus couldn’t make up his mind if the invention of the sticky, resilient tape was a good thing for mankind or a bad thing.

Andrei clicked the safety buckles around his torso. Klaus counted five clicks of safety.

He leaned over slightly to peer over the edge of the cliff. He estimated a three point ​five second drop to death. “You sure it’ll fly?”

Andrei glanced at his DIY paraglider made entirely out of duct tape and grinned. “Only one way to find out.”

Later, Klaus chuckled as Andrei slipped through the air like a feather. Lucky son of a…

100 words

Phew! Saved by the word count.

I googled unusual uses of duct tape and found that a duct-tape parachute was one of them! Some are just downright hilarious. Including a hammock, furniture upholstering, CPU boxes, and even a wallet!

Written for Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. Write a story in 100 words or less. Click the blue frog to add your story or read over 70 different stories based on this same prompt.

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In a Jam

PHOTO PROMPT © Priya Bajpal

As a busy, single mom of four robust boys, organisation was key to handling life. Storage was a major element in the parental organisational plan. Mason jars were Sal’s new thing. They could store anything from bits and bobs, jam, pencils, coins, spices – you name it.

Devon had even found it useful for his school project. Some odd-looking crafty thing. She didn’t ask any questions. The main thing is he did it on his own. Later at work, she questioned the jar’s usefulness, when she reached for her lunch (salad in a jar), and pulled out Devon’s project instead.

99 words

This was a challenging picture for me. It’s a bit late but I wish all my fellow fictioneers a Happy and Prosperous New Year! Looking forward to another year with this awesome lot.

Written for Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. Write a story in 100 words or less. Click the blue frog to  read more flash fiction or to submit your own.

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He aint heavy, he’s my brother

Copyright – Adam Ickes

He waited for hours, watching. Waiting. Hidden behind a tree. Or pretending to stroll on the park lanes. People didn’t notice Thomas. Not when he asked for coins in his cup, and not as he circled this part of the park. His eyes fixed on the pair of boots abandoned on the low wall. He waited for the owner to claim them. Everyone ignored them, just as they ignored Thomas. Taking a deep breath, he crept closer and plucked them off the wall. Safely on his way, he felt pleased his brother would have a good pair of boots.

99 words

Written for Friday Fictioneers, hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. Write a story in 100 words or less.

To those celebrating Christmas, I wish you a very Merry Christmas with your family and loved ones!

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One of my favourite songs as a child.

Lost and found

Copyright –Douglas M. MacIlroy

 

When he first entered his cabin up in the woods, the strange item caught him off guard. Not strange as in unknown, he was old not ancient, but strange as in not belonging to him. He could use a computer, even operate this laptop version too. Only he didn’t own a laptop. Even stranger still was the young woman who rose from her hiding place behind the kitchen island, hands in a surrender position at her shoulders.

She looked familiar. Then he remembered. Dusty. Hazy. Her face on the news, posters and milk cartons. Years ago. Missing. 

“Dad?” she said.

100 words

 

Getting my flash fiction in just before the doors slide closed on this Friday Fictioneers train.

I don’t know how this guy didn’t know he had a daughter. It seems people have lied to him and a missing girl (on the run or kidnapped) comes to find him. Guess they’ll have a lot to work through! Once she proves she is his daughter, that is.

Written for Friday Fictioneers hosted by the gracious Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. Write a story in 100 words or less. Click the blue frog icon to submit your story or read what others have written.

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Love and friendship in a zombie apocalypse

PHOTO PROMPT © Dawn M. Miller

 

Trix leaned against the wall. His broken leg wrapped pointlessly with a shirt. Soraya looked around the tunnel, packed with grimy, injured survivors. Weary from fear.

“I was going to ask her to… marry me.”

“I’m sorry, Trix. But she’s gone. She wouldn’t have made it.”

“If she’s alive… she needs help.” Words dribbled out of his cracked lips.

She held a water bottle up to his lips. The thought of Mira alive, alone with those things, moved her.

“Fine. I’ll go back for her. But I’ll need weapons. Lots of them.”

He nodded to his gun, “Start with this.”

100 words

A hundred words was not enough to portray the scene. Settled on this version.

It’s been a while. Looking forward to mingling with you wonderful people once again!

Written for Friday Fictioneers. Write a story in 100 words or less. Click the blue frog to add yours or read more flash fiction based on this week’s image prompt provided by Dawn M. Miller.

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Summer distractions

PHOTO PROMPT © J.S. Brand

 

Hector had trouble concentrating.

“Stop eyeing the busty boss, and get to it!” Alan, commanded him, mouth twisting around a chewed up twig.

“I wasn’t even looking at her bust – quick, she’s coming! Look busy!”

“I have been busy.”

A white summer dress breezed towards them, skimming slim calves. She tapped on the carved wood, sighed and cocked her head. “Boys, this is no good. It needs to be more… interesting. More depth. It’s too shallow.” The wind carried her off.

“I think she’s talking about you.” Hector grinned. Then, “You think she was flirting with me?’

“Work!” growled Alan.

100 words

Well, one can always wish, Hector.

Hope you enjoyed this week’s flash fiction. Thanks To J.S Brand for this week’s intriguing prompt.

Written for Friday Fictoneers hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge is to write a story in 100 words or less.

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Sinking ship

PHOTO PROMPT © Roger Bultot

 

The painting caught her eye on her first day of work at the museum. Art always spoke to some part of her, but this was different.  The sinking ship was vivid and disturbingly familiar, although it was hundreds of years old.

That sense of familiarity stayed with her long after she left work at closing time. Following her into her dreams,  where people beside her leapt off the sides of the sinking ship into icy waters. A little boy cried as she tried to soothe him in a language she shouldn’t have known, while icy fear turned her skin pale.

100 words

I’m not a believer in past lives or reincarnation. They make for interesting stories though, don’t they?

Written for Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge is to write a story in 100 words or less.

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Stories that changed me: The Star by Arthur C. Clarke (1955)

When I made my quiet return to my passion of writing, I began with a course in creative writing, and short story writing. Part of this course was to read and read and read. And read some more.

During this course I discovered the grandfathers of science fiction, Jules Verne and HG Wells. And then I stumbled upon The Star by Arthur C. Clarke.

“The joys of life are often in those moments of stumbling when expectation is at its lowest so that the impact of the discovery is at its greatest.”

(Yes, feel free to quote me on that.)

This story written in the 1950s about space exploration towards a star that – oh, wait. I’ll let this description from Kings Alumni Community tell it for me.

“The Star” is the story of a group of space explorers from Earth returning from an expedition to a remote star system, where they discovered the remnants of an advanced civilization destroyed when their sun went supernova. Their chief astrophysicist, a Jesuit priest, is suffering from a deep crisis of faith, triggered by some undisclosed event during the journey. This story appeared in the magazine Infinity Science Fiction in 1955 and won the Hugo award in 1956. It later appeared in Arthur C Clarke’s book of short stories, The Other Side of the Sky.

Something about ‘crisis of faith‘ and ‘advanced civilisation destroyed‘ and ‘supernova‘ pulled me in. Tickling my own questions on religion and humanity. On universal love and connection beyond human contemplation let alone understanding. And also, what was a Jesuit priest doing leading a space expedition?!

This marked the beginning of a hidden love for sic-fi and fantasy that I wasn’t even aware of. The way it was able to explore humanity and question deeply between right and wrong, even redefining ideas completely, appealed to my inner philosopher.

And by the end of this short trip to space, I was forever changed.

Perception altered.

Mind blown.

New dimensions opening.

Ending with a question, it triggered many of my own questions.

You can read Arthur C. Clarke’s short story The Star, here.

It is three thousand light-years to the Vatican. Once, I believed that space could have no power over faith, just as I believed the heavens declared the glory of God’s handiwork. Now I have seen that handiwork, and my faith is sorely troubled. I stare at the crucifix that hangs on the cabin wall above the Mark VI Computer, and for the first time in my life I wonder if it is no more than an empty symbol.click to read on

 

 

Fairytales and Happy Endings

PHOTO PROMPT © Jilly Funell

 

In the old days, we had magic mirrors, crystal balls and reflection pools. Today we have Facebook. Fairy God Mother was eager to see what her princesses were up to.

An image popped up of a yellow-haired beauty, locks trailing the floors of a refurbished circular room. Guten Tag! Renovations completed! Hashtag new life begins.

FGM smiled, then grimaced at the next image.

Another blonde pouted, in that awful duck face. Date night with my prince! In the comments a brunette posted, Enjoy the honeymoon phase while it lasts, Cindy. Once a beast always a beast.

Oh Belle, sighed FGM.

100 words

I hope you enjoyed my modern take on fairytale princesses. I quite enjoyed writing this too.

Thought I would add this much needed update: The abbreviated form of Fairy God Mother to FGM was definitely intended for humour. However I did not have enough words to add a tidy quip that it didn’t have any references to genital mutilation of any kind.

And the three princesses are in sequential order: Rapunzel, Cinderella and Belle from Beauty and the Beast.

Is anyone here participating in NaNoWriMo? I plan on doing it this year. Properly this time. 😉

Written for Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge is to write a story in 100 words or less. Go!

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