Last day of school

PHOTO PROMPT © Gah Learner

Mishka pulled the curtain aside, hoping to see a window. Her heart sank when she saw it was boarded up shut with wooden planks. Her breath came in sobs, heart thudding faster in her chest. Was her mother looking for her? Thoughts of her mother brought fresh tears.

A woman entered the room. She wasn’t in the car when those men pulled her into it on her way to school. Hope rose like a red balloon in her chest.

“Please ma’am. I want to go to my mommy.”

She eyed her up and down. And shut the door.

98 words

Not one of my favourite stories, but only because of the topic. This was extremely difficult to write. Usually I have no issues connecting with my dark side to conjure up all sorts of evil and crime. But to try to empathise with a child, kidnapped from her safe world, not knowing what will happen to her, or if she’ll see her family, friends and school again, was heart-breaking for me.

Child trafficking is on the rise. At ridiculous levels. I find it intolerable that elected governments are so quick to initiate changes to taxes, fuel prices, land appropriation or other laws that line their pockets. But horrendously slow to put a stop to crime. Rather it feels as if they create a safe haven for such syndicates to operate in. I can bet anything, that due to the rapid increase in child trafficking, it points to politicians or other high-level officials lining their pockets from this modern day slavery.

In South Africa, children cannot walk to school without running a high risk of being kidnapped and disappearing into thin air. They’re taking children from outside the school gates. Last week, they smashed the rear window of a car, to try to steal a baby from his car seat. This is the level of desperation and enticingly lucrative nature of child trafficking. Luckily, the mother managed to drive away and they failed to unbuckle him in time.

The culprits should be given a life sentence or the death penalty. A child kidnapped and sold into slavery has had her life taken from her.

Written for Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. Write a story in 100 words or less. Click the blue frog icon to read more flash fiction.

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Night of the Star

PHOTO PROMPT © Ted Strutz

 

Some things never change.

Nadia looked up at the full moon, brilliantly white. The same full moon lit up the dark roads all those years ago as she held Mama’s hand fearfully. Sobbing for her murdered Papa. Led to that unknown place beyond the mountains she knew so well. She still hated that word refugee. But over the years it became part of her like the moles on her skin.

“Ready Nadia!” her new captain slapped her shoulder. Cheers erupted from the stadium crowd as the team ran on to the pitch. Refugee to star striker.

So much has changed.

 

100 words

This one is so close to my heart. I had a previous life of entrepreneurship (don’t ask), and my passion was Muslim women in sports. So I started a sportswear brand aimed at developing and encouraging Muslim women in sports. Many women are not active enough for various reasons.

Today I saw this video of Nadia Nadim who has signed on with Man City Women, and I feel like a proud mother hen. Despite the business not working out, this is what it was all for. To develop top level sportswomen. Her story is incredible. Boy did she break barriers. Her father was executed in Afghanistan by the Taliban. Her family fled to what they thought was London, but unknowingly ended up in Denmark. It was the mistake that led to her career as a footballer.

She has achieved a lot in her life already and still plans for much more: watch the video!

 

 

Written for Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle. The challenge is to write an entire story in 100 words or less. Click here to read more flash fiction.

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The rich man by the sea

PHOTO PROMPT © Dale Rogerson

 

Moonlight glinted off crystal glasses. Patrons dined al fresco on fish caught from the sea that lapped close by. He inhaled, salty but fresh. So different than the village he grew up in. Some men huddled at the bar, sneaked glances at him, sneers and frowns. Words sailed on moonlight. “Darkie”. “Probably stole to get rich.” “They’re all crooks.”

He guessed even his accented English would be an affront. To them, a sign of lower intelligence. Apartheid ended years ago, but the prejudiced were enslaved by their egos and twisted logic. A much harder trap to flee.

97 words

 

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In general South Africa is a caring, connected community that at times even overcomes its prejudices to shine brightly amongst humanity. This is merely an illustration of the more subtle prejudices and stereotypes that people may have against one another, seemingly harmless, but simmering under the surface.

 

Written for the 100 word challenge Friday Fictioneers hosted by the awesome Rochelle, who writes mainly from the persecutive of the Jewish experience of the holocaust (and so much more). I’d strongly recommend heading over to her blog to read some very interesting posts.

Click on the frog or click here to view more flash fiction.

 

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